Friday, October 16, 2009

Important Women's Health Issue:

Do you have feelings of inadequacy?
Do you suffer from shyness?
Do you sometimes wish you were more assertive?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, ask your doctor or
pharmacist about Margaritas.

Margaritas are the safe, natural way to feel better and more confident
about yourself and your actions. Margaritas can help ease you out of your
shyness and let you tell the world that you're ready and willing to do
just about anything. You will notice the benefits of Margaritas almost
immediately and with a regimen of regular doses you can overcome any
obstacles that prevent you from living the life you want to live. Shyness
and awkwardness will be a thing of the past and you will discover many
talents you never knew you had. Stop hiding and start living, with
Margaritas.

Margaritas may not be right for everyone. Women who are pregnant or
nursing should not use Margaritas. However, women who wouldn't mind
nursing or becoming pregnant are encouraged to try it.

Side effects may include:
- Dizziness
- Nausea
- Vomiting
- Incarceration
- Erotic lustfulness
- Loss of motor control
- Loss of clothing
- Loss of money
- Loss of virginity
- Table dancing
- Headache
- Dehydration
- Dry mouth
- And a desire to sing Karaoke

WARNINGS:
The consumption of Margaritas may make you think you are
whispering when you are not.
The consumption of Margaritas may cause you to tell your
friends over and over again that you love them.
The consumption of Margaritas may cause you to think you can
sing.

The consumption of Margaritas may make you think you can
logically converse with members of the opposite sex without spitting.

Please share this with other women who may need Margaritas.

Saturday, October 10, 2009

On Obama's nomination...

Although Obama's nomination was a complete surprise, even to him, we can not forget that his presidency has done so much for the American people. We the US can show the rest of the world the possibility of resolving our countries racial conflicts --seeing that a people who were once slaves--are now free enough to become president of one of the greatest nations in the world! That’s amazing.

Friday, October 09, 2009

Obama on the nobel Peace Prize

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT ON WINNING THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE

Rose Garden

THE PRESIDENT: Good morning. Well, this is not how I expected to wake up this morning. After I received the news, Malia walked in and said, "Daddy, you won the Nobel Peace Prize, and it is Bo's birthday!" And then Sasha added, "Plus, we have a three-day weekend coming up." So it's good to have kids to keep things in perspective.

I am both surprised and deeply humbled by the decision of the Nobel Committee. Let me be clear: I do not view it as a recognition of my own accomplishments, but rather as an affirmation of American leadership on behalf of aspirations held by people in all nations.

To be honest, I do not feel that I deserve to be in the company of so many of the transformative figures who've been honored by this prize -- men and women who've inspired me and inspired the entire world through their courageous pursuit of peace.

But I also know that this prize reflects the kind of world that those men and women, and all Americans, want to build -- a world that gives life to the promise of our founding documents. And I know that throughout history, the Nobel Peace Prize has not just been used to honor specific achievement; it's also been used as a means to give momentum to a set of causes. And that is why I will accept this award as a call to action -- a call for all nations to confront the common challenges of the 21st century.

These challenges can't be met by any one leader or any one nation. And that's why my administration has worked to establish a new era of engagement in which all nations must take responsibility for the world we seek. We cannot tolerate a world in which nuclear weapons spread to more nations and in which the terror of a nuclear holocaust endangers more people. And that's why we've begun to take concrete steps to pursue a world without nuclear weapons, because all nations have the right to pursue peaceful nuclear power, but all nations have the responsibility to demonstrate their peaceful intentions.

We cannot accept the growing threat posed by climate change, which could forever damage the world that we pass on to our children -- sowing conflict and famine; destroying coastlines and emptying cities. And that's why all nations must now accept their share of responsibility for transforming the way that we use energy.

We can't allow the differences between peoples to define the way that we see one another, and that's why we must pursue a new beginning among people of different faiths and races and religions; one based upon mutual interest and mutual respect.

And we must all do our part to resolve those conflicts that have caused so much pain and hardship over so many years, and that effort must include an unwavering commitment that finally realizes that the rights of all Israelis and Palestinians to live in peace and security in nations of their own.

We can't accept a world in which more people are denied opportunity and dignity that all people yearn for -- the ability to get an education and make a decent living; the security that you won't have to live in fear of disease or violence without hope for the future.

And even as we strive to seek a world in which conflicts are resolved peacefully and prosperity is widely shared, we have to confront the world as we know it today. I am the Commander-in-Chief of a country that's responsible for ending a war and working in another theater to confront a ruthless adversary that directly threatens the American people and our allies. I'm also aware that we are dealing with the impact of a global economic crisis that has left millions of Americans looking for work. These are concerns that I confront every day on behalf of the American people.

Some of the work confronting us will not be completed during my presidency. Some, like the elimination of nuclear weapons, may not be completed in my lifetime. But I know these challenges can be met so long as it's recognized that they will not be met by one person or one nation alone. This award is not simply about the efforts of my administration -- it's about the courageous efforts of people around the world.

And that's why this award must be shared with everyone who strives for justice and dignity -- for the young woman who marches silently in the streets on behalf of her right to be heard even in the face of beatings and bullets; for the leader imprisoned in her own home because she refuses to abandon her commitment to democracy; for the soldier who sacrificed through tour after tour of duty on behalf of someone half a world away; and for all those men and women across the world who sacrifice their safety and their freedom and sometime their lives for the cause of peace.

That has always been the cause of America. That's why the world has always looked to America. And that's why I believe America will continue to lead.

Thank you very much.

Wednesday, October 07, 2009

Comments on the Post-Governance Era

It is no doubt that the world has changed in the past year-year and half with the financial crisis and Obama taking office. Their is a renewed call for public administrators who are responsive and professional at their jobs. The question I ask is how much of this new era will be like the New Deal Era and or how will it be different? In terms of better government regulation over creating subsidy programs or the engagement of new fields to improve the economy like the green jobs movement, etc.

Also the bigger questions that also comes up is how the rest of the world sees the United States. And how the US will behave in a more equal global system. Like it or not, the rest of the world saw what happens when the markets prevailed (over past 30 years) or were poorly managed by the state and the disastrous economic and personal effects of that. They may opt out of the free market economies all together, which is exactly opposite of what the US has been trying to encourage for the past 100 years! What will that world look like.... Joe Stiglitz's video interview published by the New Yorker also suggest these ideas and quesitons View http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid41945846001?bclid=41803761001&bctid=42015071001


To conclude, the field of public administration tomorrow will, not only, analyze the same old problems through different lenses (gender, race, or class), but it will also use different techniques (narratives, path dependency, comparative case study or data analysis), to analyze the wicked problems and confront them globally. The next cohort of public administration theorists and academics will evaluate issues such as climate change, terrorism, transnational migration, economic decline and global governance. They will promote democracy and global institutions within the context of supranational state like the United Nations. Furthermore a proliferation of schools of public administration and development that have spanned into the developing world will be come stronger as methods will become disbursed round the globe. The same paradoxes of rational vs. humanistic; democracy vs. efficiency; and scientific vs. normative will continue to be contentious. Yet the overarching theme of public administration will continue to be how to serve better the public good for all of humanity.

Saturday, October 03, 2009

Obama on Unity and Equality

Unity is the great need of the hour - the great need of this hour. Not because it sounds pleasant or because it makes us feel good, but because it's the only way we can overcome the essential deficit that exists in this country.

I'm not talking about a budget deficit. I'm not talking about a trade deficit. I'm not talking about a deficit of good ideas or new plans.

I'm talking about a moral deficit. I'm talking about an empathy deficit. I'm taking about an inability to recognize ourselves in one another; to understand that we are our brother's keeper; we are our sister's keeper; that, in the words of Dr. King, we are all tied together in a single garment of destiny.

We have an empathy deficit when we're still sending our children down corridors of shame - schools in the forgotten corners of America where the color of your skin still affects the content of your education.

We have a deficit when CEOs are making more in ten minutes than some workers make in ten months; when families lose their homes so that lenders make a profit; when mothers can't afford a doctor when their children get sick.

We have a deficit in this country when there is Scooter Libby justice for some and Jena justice for others; when our children see nooses hanging from a schoolyard tree today, in the present, in the twenty-first century.

We have a deficit when homeless veterans sleep on the streets of our cities; when innocents are slaughtered in the deserts of Darfur; when young Americans serve tour after tour of duty in a war that should've never been authorized and never been waged.

And we have a deficit when it takes a breach in our levees to reveal a breach in our compassion; when it takes a terrible storm to reveal the hungry that God calls on us to feed; the sick He calls on us to care for; the least of these He commands that we treat as our own.

So we have a deficit to close. We have walls - barriers to justice and equality - that must come down. And to do this, we know that unity is the great need of this hour.
---Barack Obama 1/20/08

Symposium on Behavioral Approaches to Bureaucratic Red Tape and Administrative Burden

CALL FOR PAPERS Public Administration Review Symposium Editors: Christopher Carrigan, The George Washington Universit...