Thursday, May 24, 2007

The World System of Locally Driven Politics

As I jumped out of the shower and was toweling off one morning last week, an epiphany came to me: I realized DC isn’t where the action is. After living in Washington for six years, I have met some of the most amazing, inspiring, life-changing individuals who desire the best for the US government and the world. Diehard liberals, hardworking bureaucrats and deep pocketed conservatives are my neighbors who live doors down in the two by two mile radius of our nation’s capital. Yet, it’s not just those amazing bright individuals who will change the world, but instead the average American Bob, John and Barbara who will ultimately make the difference.

DC reflects some of the greatest paradoxes of our global village. While its population is diverse—the policies that come from it are not. Washington hosts extremely impoverish inter-city bums, ambassadors from around the world, veterans, the rich American elite, recent immigrants from El Salvador and Ethiopia and an active contingent of vocal gay and transsexual individuals. Yet, the US government’s policies on welfare, gay rights, economic development or social security do not necessarily reflect this diverse population. Rather, policies must be approved by the impassive US population.

What is more grueling? The US population comprising less than ten percent of the entire world population makes policies that affect the rest of the world. This was certainly notably when millions of anxious world citizens glued their eyes to CNN International to hear the precious results of the US presidential races in 2000 and 2004. More and more the world sees the US as a global leader in politics and policies. Yet the US population, in its majority do not care what Washington says or does. They hardly even come out to vote every four years. There is not a more important job than to keep the US government transparent and honest at these vital times. Internet may reach these people, but most importantly, the discussion must be set in a basic language that is understandable by all in order to make a difference. Only listening to this multitude of voices and discussions will change the world.

1 comment:

Rubens said...

Un gusto conocer tu blogg y descubrir facetas tuyas como el arte de la fotografía. Un beso.
Rubens

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